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Jack Staff
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Re: Brexit

Post by Jack Staff » 10 Feb 2019, 11:26

Onelife wrote:
10 Feb 2019, 10:52
Hi Jack,
This past two years have been a sharp learning curve and will no doubt be an even more daunting one for those who may wish to follow in our footsteps...but this situation is what it is and we have to find a way through it.....For better or for worse history will be our judge but to have never tried is to accept what is wrong.
On the face of it I can accept that TM's deal is a sensible solution to a vote of 52/48. We will half leave the EU.
In reality any solution that makes allies of Barney and myself is doomed. We (the public) will never stop arguing over this.
Onelife wrote:
10 Feb 2019, 10:52
I'm not to worried about our negotiating skills as we won't find ourselves in the same negotiating position we have been in with the EU who didn't want to negotiate because they didn't want us to leave....We will in effect be starting from a relatively level playing field when it comes to negotiating trade deals in a global market place.
Unfortunately that is not the case. Japan has already said it will extract better terms from us than the EU. Simply because they need the EU more than they need the UK. It is not a level playing field. This will be replicated across all deals we negotiate.
We can not negotiate trade deals concurrently. We simply do not have the resources. We will of course go for the best/biggest ones first, but to replicate what we currently have will take decades. All the time lagging behind our competitors, making our position weaker.
Testiculi ad Brexitum. Venceremos.

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Re: Brexit

Post by Jack Staff » 10 Feb 2019, 11:34

Ranchi wrote:
10 Feb 2019, 11:02
If the politicians had come out on 24th June 2016 waving a document and stating ‘We have a great deal for the UK’ Would there have been 91 pages covering a period 2+ years claiming we have capitulated & should have got a better deal? Is it any surprise that negotiations have been so protracted...after all there are a lot of staff to pay.
If the politicians had come out and said we will take two years deciding what we want and a plan to do it, triggering Article 50 in 2018. All the current problems could have been avoided, with a sensible exit in 2020.
As it is will we still be arguing with the EU and ourselves in 2021.
Testiculi ad Brexitum. Venceremos.

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Re: Brexit

Post by towny44 » 10 Feb 2019, 12:27

Jack Staff wrote:
10 Feb 2019, 11:34
Ranchi wrote:
10 Feb 2019, 11:02
If the politicians had come out on 24th June 2016 waving a document and stating ‘We have a great deal for the UK’ Would there have been 91 pages covering a period 2+ years claiming we have capitulated & should have got a better deal? Is it any surprise that negotiations have been so protracted...after all there are a lot of staff to pay.
If the politicians had come out and said we will take two years deciding what we want and a plan to do it, triggering Article 50 in 2018. All the current problems could have been avoided, with a sensible exit in 2020.
As it is will we still be arguing with the EU and ourselves in 2021.
Jack, another of your pointless posts.
I don't believe the EU would have allowed us to negotiate with them before we triggered article 50, and deciding amongst ourselves what we wanted would have been extremely pointless without knowing whether the EU would seriously consider our requests.
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Re: Brexit

Post by Gill W » 10 Feb 2019, 14:44

barney wrote:
09 Feb 2019, 12:56
I was reading an article by a guy who thinks that he may have come up with a compromise to the Irish Backstop issue in the event of no deal.

Why not have a referendum ?

The people of Northern Ireland could be asked the question.

a vote on whether to

Stay in a Customs Union with Ireland, for trade purposes, thus negating a border with Ireland but putting one up with the rest of the UK
Or
To leave the Customs Union with the rest of the UK with the potential for a border of some description in Ireland.

Very simple, tick a box and the majority wins.

Why not asked those most affected what they actually want ?
Anything relating to the Irish border affects both sides of the border, therefore they'd need to have a referendum in both NI and Ireland.

They had a a referendum on the Good Friday agreement on both sides of the border and the result was very clear cut in support of the agreement.

Heaven knows what'd happen if the results of Backstop referendum were 50/50, or if one side of the border voted one way and the other side they other way. Which referendum would you respect! :wtf:
Gill

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Re: Brexit

Post by Gill W » 10 Feb 2019, 14:53

Manoverboard wrote:
09 Feb 2019, 14:04
Jack Staff wrote:
09 Feb 2019, 13:24
Manoverboard wrote:
09 Feb 2019, 13:19
… and I was hearing about a software solution to the backstop situation, tis based on a system used in Sweden I believe. :clap:
I thought you were against freedom of movement?
I understood that it was a software solution to the control of goods rather than people.

ps … for the record I am not against ' freedom of movement ' providing we ( the UK ) dictate the terms of that movement.
I assume you mean people coming into the UK.

Freedom of movement works both ways. We can't dictate the terms on which UK citizens reside and work in the EU - I can't see them going for that

Unless all parties are in agreement and are all treated exactly the same, it's not freedom of movement.
Gill

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Re: Brexit

Post by barney » 10 Feb 2019, 17:46

Jack Staff wrote:
10 Feb 2019, 11:34
Ranchi wrote:
10 Feb 2019, 11:02
If the politicians had come out on 24th June 2016 waving a document and stating ‘We have a great deal for the UK’ Would there have been 91 pages covering a period 2+ years claiming we have capitulated & should have got a better deal? Is it any surprise that negotiations have been so protracted...after all there are a lot of staff to pay.
If the politicians had come out and said we will take two years deciding what we want and a plan to do it, triggering Article 50 in 2018. All the current problems could have been avoided, with a sensible exit in 2020.
As it is will we still be arguing with the EU and ourselves in 2021.
Again we are in 100% agreement jack
What is going on ??? :lol:

I would have timed the UK departure date to coincide with the end of the EU budget in 2020.
So, we would have been fully 'paid up' right to our departure date.
That would have negated any argument about 'money owed' and certainly no 39 billion bribe money.
I would have taken full ownership for any EU pension rights of UK workers and built that back into our own budget.

I would have kicked 'No deal' into hyperdrive and made all appropriate arrangements, whilst negotiating a trade deal in good faith with the EU.
Then, if agreement could not be reached by departure date, a least both sides would have had plenty of notice.

The Irish 'border issue' would have been decided by the trade agreement, not a withdrawal agreement.
There is no compulsory mandate for a withdrawal agreement in article 50.

Although the Irish border issue is caused by Brexit, it is up to the EU to come up with an agreement, as they are the ones looking to protect their external border, not us.
The choice is theirs as to what type of border is enforced.
We should just go along with what they propose.
When you consider the piddley amount of traffic daily, the Calais border is far more of an issue for both parties.
I cannot believe that any sort of border between Ireland and NI will reinstate the previous situation, regarding terrorism.
I think that this is a red herring in the Brexit argument.

Anyone can see that May cocked up from the very beginning.
Once again, she was badly advised, and once again, listened to them and took it.
Advisors advise - Leaders lead
Unfortunately, we have been lacking leadership form day one.

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Re: Brexit

Post by Jack Staff » 10 Feb 2019, 18:09

barney wrote:
10 Feb 2019, 17:46
Again we are in 100% agreement jack
What is going on ??? :lol:
...
Anyone can see that May cocked up from the very beginning.
Once again, she was badly advised, and once again, listened to them and took it.
Advisors advise - Leaders lead
Unfortunately, we have been lacking leadership form day one.
Well I might have 'accidentally' left out the bit that if we had spent two years planning sensibly and methodically, without the panic of upcoming Bidet, sorry B-day, we would have realised it was a stupid thing to do and decided not to do it.
So normal service resumed. ;)
But I certainly agree 100% on your last bit.
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Re: Brexit

Post by Onelife » 10 Feb 2019, 21:49

I don't agree with Barney's last bit...., in fact l don't agree with his first bit either.

What Barney would have done and what the UK government would have been allowed to do are two very different matters altogether...Once David Cameron started the clock ticking back in 2015 and the subsequent result in 2016 there was no turning back.Theresa May and Brexit would have been over had she said we won't be leaving until 2020....brexiteers from all sides would have seen it as a remainer ploy to keep us in the union.

I do undestand where you are coming from Barney and had she had the mandate to do so your suggestions would probably have been the better way forward but time waits for no one she had little option but to set a date sooner rather than 4 years latter.

Theresa has made mistakes, the biggest of which was being badly advised in calling a GE..... Leaders do indeed lead Barney but leading with her hands tied was always going to make Brexit a catalogue of compromises, compromises which have done nothing to make her job any easier, indeed many would argue she has achieved the imposible in getting Brexit to where we are now, especially considering what she has been up against from both sides of the channel..... strong leadership comes from those who deliver what they promise and to date no one in my opinion can say that she hasn't tried to keep that promise.
Last edited by Onelife on 10 Feb 2019, 21:56, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Brexit

Post by Manoverboard » 11 Feb 2019, 09:42

Gill W wrote:
10 Feb 2019, 14:53
Manoverboard wrote:
09 Feb 2019, 14:04
Jack Staff wrote:
09 Feb 2019, 13:24
I thought you were against freedom of movement?
I understood that it was a software solution to the control of goods rather than people.

ps … for the record I am not against ' freedom of movement ' providing we ( the UK ) dictate the terms of that movement.
I assume you mean people coming into the UK.

Freedom of movement works both ways. We can't dictate the terms on which UK citizens reside and work in the EU - I can't see them going for that

Unless all parties are in agreement and are all treated exactly the same, it's not freedom of movement.
Indeed so …. I was explaining to Jack my thoughts on movement of people coming into the UK. The EU wouldn't allow what I wanted so I voted to Leave. :lol:

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Re: Brexit

Post by Jack Staff » 11 Feb 2019, 10:09

Manoverboard wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 09:42
Indeed so …. I was explaining to Jack my thoughts on movement of people coming into the UK. The EU wouldn't allow what I wanted so I voted to Leave. :lol:
I was explaining to Manoverboard that Swedish software won't work in this situation. :lol:
Testiculi ad Brexitum. Venceremos.

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Re: Brexit

Post by barney » 11 Feb 2019, 10:23

Onelife wrote:
10 Feb 2019, 21:49
I don't agree with Barney's last bit...., in fact l don't agree with his first bit either.

What Barney would have done and what the UK government would have been allowed to do are two very different matters altogether...Once David Cameron started the clock ticking back in 2015 and the subsequent result in 2016 there was no turning back.Theresa May and Brexit would have been over had she said we won't be leaving until 2020....brexiteers from all sides would have seen it as a remainer ploy to keep us in the union.

I do undestand where you are coming from Barney and had she had the mandate to do so your suggestions would probably have been the better way forward but time waits for no one she had little option but to set a date sooner rather than 4 years latter.

Theresa has made mistakes, the biggest of which was being badly advised in calling a GE..... Leaders do indeed lead Barney but leading with her hands tied was always going to make Brexit a catalogue of compromises, compromises which have done nothing to make her job any easier, indeed many would argue she has achieved the imposible in getting Brexit to where we are now, especially considering what she has been up against from both sides of the channel..... strong leadership comes from those who deliver what they promise and to date no one in my opinion can say that she hasn't tried to keep that promise.
I think therein lies the problem.
"What we are allowed to do" ?

There is no one stopping us from doing exactly what we want, but we have to accept that there are consequences to our actions.

The EU dictated the terms of the WA and trade deal and we meekly went along with it because that is what the EU "allowed us to do".
We must change this mind set.

I'll happily concede that May has been up against it and the constant interference from those try to thwart the process has been a massive hinderance.
With the likes of Blair having meetings with Tusk and telling him that a tough EU stance will make the UK change it's mind haven't helped.
The EU leaders are clearly now furious because what the Remainers told them would happen, hasn't.

Extract from the Express
"EU insiders tell me that Tusk allowed himself to become convinced Brexit was going to be overturned after a plan was constructed between senior Brussels figures and British pro-Remain politicians, led by Blair, that seemed to be working perfectly.
Part of the plan involved Brussels playing hardball in negotiations, so that the deal Theresa May was able to put in front of MPs was profoundly unappetising.
That advice to Brussels was relayed by a stream of pro-Remain visitors from the heart of the British establishment."

They didn't bank on the UK standing firm and have realised, too late, that it is either negotiate properly or they will also have to face the consequences.

https://www.politico.eu/article/study-h ... rman-jobs/

So, one minute we are being told that nobody in Europe is even interested in Brexit and they are hardly discussing it.
Then, the next minute, the reality of the situation is driven home.

The EU should be falling over itself to complete a trade deal with it's biggest and most influential customer, not belittling us for political traction.
The deal they have just agreed with Japan pales into insignificance compared to the one they can get with the UK

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Re: Brexit

Post by Jack Staff » 11 Feb 2019, 10:28

barney wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 10:23
The deal they have just agreed with Japan pales into insignificance compared to the one they can get with the UK
Please clarify this statement.
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Re: Brexit

Post by barney » 11 Feb 2019, 10:33

Jack Staff wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 10:28
barney wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 10:23
The deal they have just agreed with Japan pales into insignificance compared to the one they can get with the UK
Please clarify this statement.
To the very best of my knowledge, The EU countries do not have a 85 billion trade deficit with Japan.
The deal with japan is obviously good for EU exporting countries but is nowhwre near what we spend annually.

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Re: Brexit

Post by Jack Staff » 11 Feb 2019, 10:39

barney wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 10:33
Jack Staff wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 10:28
barney wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 10:23
The deal they have just agreed with Japan pales into insignificance compared to the one they can get with the UK
Please clarify this statement.
To the very best of my knowledge, The EU countries do not have a 85 billion trade deficit with Japan.
The deal with japan is obviously good for EU exporting countries but is nowhwre near what we spend annually.
Ok, but we have (had) a deal and the Japanese have not (until now).
Because they have twice our population and are richer than us, I don't think the significance of this deal can be overlooked.
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Re: Brexit

Post by Jack Staff » 11 Feb 2019, 10:55

The EU, killing our industries....
https://www.thelocal.fr/20190211/austra ... arine-deal?

Not
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Re: Brexit

Post by towny44 » 11 Feb 2019, 11:17

Jack Staff wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 10:55
The EU, killing our industries....
https://www.thelocal.fr/20190211/austra ... arine-deal?

Not
Forgive me if I read the article wrongly but these submarines, although of French design, will be built in Australia, now how is that preserving EU industries?
Last edited by towny44 on 11 Feb 2019, 11:17, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Brexit

Post by Jack Staff » 11 Feb 2019, 11:29

Why aren't they built in Australia by BAE? That €30 billion would go a long way in it's UK factories.
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Re: Brexit

Post by towny44 » 11 Feb 2019, 12:05

Jack Staff wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 11:29
Why aren't they built in Australia by BAE? That €30 billion would go a long way in it's UK factories.
That's competition Jack, and by the reading of the article the French had the best option available.
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Re: Brexit

Post by Jack Staff » 11 Feb 2019, 12:11

Yes, the French do have a better option.
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Re: Brexit

Post by Manoverboard » 11 Feb 2019, 12:13

Jack Staff wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 10:09
Manoverboard wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 09:42
Indeed so …. I was explaining to Jack my thoughts on movement of people coming into the UK. The EU wouldn't allow what I wanted so I voted to Leave. :lol:
I was explaining to Manoverboard that Swedish software won't work in this situation. :lol:
Yes … but you didn't explain why it wouldn't work once it was modified :wave:

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Re: Brexit

Post by Jack Staff » 11 Feb 2019, 13:16

Manoverboard wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 12:13
Yes … but you didn't explain why it wouldn't work once it was modified :wave:
Because Sweden has a 'Hard' border with Norway for trucks. So doesn't help there.
Norway is in Schengen and has FOM. So no need for passport checks.

Just can't see how any software, Swedish or otherwise, has much bearing on the N. Irish Border.
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Re: Brexit

Post by Jack Staff » 11 Feb 2019, 13:31

We had the ferry company that copied it's T&C's from a fast food site.

Not to be out done Farage’s new Brexit party has copied it's T&C's from a kids nursery in Lowestoft. Seems apt.

You can play spot the difference.....
http://www.thebrexitparty.org/privacy-policy
http://www.kidszonelowestoft.co.uk/privacy-policy
Last edited by Jack Staff on 11 Feb 2019, 13:31, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Brexit

Post by barney » 11 Feb 2019, 13:40

Calm down Jack ! :roll:
That's just an internet template that both lots have used.
It's not a million miles away from my own, which, by the way, we set up with an internet template.

There is no need to re-invent the wheel every time you do something.
We unashamedly nick other people's ideas all the time, when marketing. :oops:
Last edited by barney on 11 Feb 2019, 13:46, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Brexit

Post by Manoverboard » 11 Feb 2019, 13:41

Jack Staff wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 13:16
Manoverboard wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 12:13
Yes … but you didn't explain why it wouldn't work once it was modified :wave:
Because Sweden has a 'Hard' border with Norway for trucks. So doesn't help there.
Norway is in Schengen and has FOM. So no need for passport checks.

Just can't see how any software, Swedish or otherwise, has much bearing on the N. Irish Border.
That's because you're not a software specialist … just saying :shifty:

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Re: Brexit

Post by Jack Staff » 11 Feb 2019, 13:42

Manoverboard wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 13:41
That's because you're not a software specialist … just saying :shifty:
How do you know?
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Re: Brexit

Post by barney » 11 Feb 2019, 13:47

Jack Staff wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 13:42
Manoverboard wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 13:41
That's because you're not a software specialist … just saying :shifty:
How do you know?
I'd take a guess and say that you are a specialist in everything known to man. :lol:

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Re: Brexit

Post by Manoverboard » 11 Feb 2019, 14:13

:lol: :clap: :lol:

ps …. except software :angel:

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Re: Brexit

Post by towny44 » 11 Feb 2019, 14:20

barney wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 13:47
Jack Staff wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 13:42
Manoverboard wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 13:41
That's because you're not a software specialist … just saying :shifty:
How do you know?
I'd take a guess and say that you are a specialist in everything known to man. :lol:
He is certainly an expert in dancing around giving direct answers. :lol:
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Re: Brexit

Post by Jack Staff » 11 Feb 2019, 14:36

So that's the level of "banter" we are down to.
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Re: Brexit

Post by barney » 11 Feb 2019, 14:39

towny44 wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 14:20
barney wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 13:47
Jack Staff wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 13:42

How do you know?
I'd take a guess and say that you are a specialist in everything known to man. :lol:
He is certainly an expert in dancing around giving direct answers. :lol:
Now, now, John !

Jack sees it as he sees it, and we see it as we see it.

Brexit has divided this country more than anything in the past.

Some, like us think that it's a wonderful opportunity while others, like Jack, think that all was pretty well rosy in the garden, so why change anything.

Only time will tell who was correct.

My opinion is that Brexit will not be as good as some hoped, while being nowhere near as bad as some fear.

The most important part for me is that this country will make it's own laws and decisions, without influence from the technocrats in the EU.

With the advent of QMV on many more issues, a few EU countries will also start to question why they should remain, particularly those with current tax advantages like Ireland and Malta.

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Re: Brexit

Post by Gill W » 11 Feb 2019, 15:29

I see May is giving an update to the Commons tomorrow. What’s the betting it’ll be the same as the last one, and the one before, and the one before that.
Gill

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Re: Brexit

Post by barney » 11 Feb 2019, 16:05

Bet it is. Really.

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Re: Brexit

Post by Onelife » 11 Feb 2019, 16:31

barney wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 13:47
Jack Staff wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 13:42
Manoverboard wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 13:41
That's because you're not a software specialist … just saying :shifty:
How do you know?
I'd take a guess and say that you are a specialist in everything known to man. :lol:
Now that did make me chuckle :lol:

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Re: Brexit

Post by Onelife » 11 Feb 2019, 16:43

Gill W wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 15:29
I see May is giving an update to the Commons tomorrow. What’s the betting it’ll be the same as the last one, and the one before, and the one before that.
I wouldn't bet against that happening but then remainers have been banging out the same old tune ever since the referendum... and getting nowhere..

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Re: Brexit

Post by Jack Staff » 11 Feb 2019, 16:45

Loving this idea that you can say anything you want, with no consideration, or grip on reality, as long as you put a :lol: at the end.

I think I might have some fun with this :lol:
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Re: Brexit

Post by barney » 11 Feb 2019, 16:49

:lol: youz funny you is :lol:

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Re: Brexit

Post by Jack Staff » 11 Feb 2019, 16:55

barney wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 16:49
:lol: youz funny you is :lol:
No. Annoyed at the implication I have lied, and no for the first time.

But now I know it is OK to say things like that, with no proof or in fact reason, as long as you :lol: at the end.
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Re: Brexit

Post by Onelife » 11 Feb 2019, 16:58

Jack Staff wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 16:45
Loving this idea that you can say anything you want, with no consideration, or grip on reality, as long as you put a :lol: at the end.

I think I might have some fun with this :lol:
Good for you Jack...

:lol: Lowers blood pressure. People who lower their blood pressure, even those who start at normal levels, will reduce their risk of stroke and heart attack. .Reduces stress hormone levels. ...
Works your abs. ...
Improves cardiac health. ...
Boosts T-cells. ...
Triggers the release of endorphins. ...
Produces a general sense of well-being

:wave:

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Re: Brexit

Post by towny44 » 11 Feb 2019, 22:36

I see the BBC newsroom was in high spirits today after the release of the Q4 economic data showing our economy is slowing down, and of course the main reason is Brexit, with maybe just a little help from the weaker demand from China for JLR cars as well as weaker world economic growth overall; with only a slight mention that our forecast for 2019 is for better growth than all of the EU, including Germany. It must have gladdened the hearts of the arch remainers like Tony Bliar, as well as many other remainers.
The BBC is looking less and less like the "good old Aunty" of yesteryear that we all remember so fondly.
Last edited by towny44 on 11 Feb 2019, 22:38, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Brexit

Post by barney » 12 Feb 2019, 08:19

The Beeb is just reporting the news, although they do seem to put a slight anti Brexit slant on things but nowhere near as bad as SkyNews.

The world economy is slowing down with the exception of the USA (despite Trump)

Brexit is certainly not helping the situation, but is by no means the cause.

I'd rather be in the UK position of slower projected growth than in some other countries positions of negative growth.

In the event of a No Deal Brexit, a few economies on the brink will be tipped over.
I was reading about the Spanish berry industry this morning. 26% of their total output currently comes to the UK.
They are very concerned about Brexit and the effects on them.

It seems that many are bothered except Juncker, Barnier and Tusk.
The only fruit that they are concerned about are cherries and who is picking them.

The integrity of the single market and customs union are more important than hundreds of thousands of European jobs … apparently.
And then they wonder why there is an EU backlash all across Europe and the rise of anti EU parties.

One single sentence in the WA can change everything.
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Re: Brexit

Post by Mervyn and Trish » 12 Feb 2019, 15:49

Even the pro-EU BBC was reporting this morning that if the EU doesn't shift on the backstop we're heading for no deal, no backstop and an immediate hard border. If anyone can be bothered to build one.

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Re: Brexit

Post by Onelife » 12 Feb 2019, 17:04

"MPs can keep on asking for “no deal” to be taken off the table but the public don’t trust those who ask this to deliver Brexit. We’d have more trust and support if we said take Remain off the table too".

Caroline Flint.

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Re: Brexit

Post by barney » 12 Feb 2019, 17:55

I'm not too sure that Remain is still on the table. Only in the minds of deluded remainers like Alistair Campbell. I'm pretty sure most MPs have given up on that, haven't they. I think it's just about on what terms we leave.

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Re: Brexit

Post by Onelife » 12 Feb 2019, 19:03

barney wrote:
12 Feb 2019, 17:55
I'm not too sure that Remain is still on the table. Only in the minds of deluded remainers like Alistair Campbell. I'm pretty sure most MPs have given up on that, haven't they. I think it's just about on what terms we leave.
Yep! You're right Barney, there'll be no resurrection for that dead donkey and the sooner the diehard remainers accept that they won't be getting a referendum either the easier it will be for the UK to deliver on one of the only two options left.


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Re: Brexit

Post by Quizzical Bob » 13 Feb 2019, 15:09

Mervyn and Trish wrote:
05 Feb 2019, 13:56
Quizzical Bob wrote:
05 Feb 2019, 13:50
towny44 wrote:
04 Feb 2019, 16:15
If ease of trade was the only criteria then your comment may have merit QB, since there are lots of other reasons, that the leavers on this thread have expounded tirelessly over the last 3 years, involved in the decision then your comment lacks any merit.
I must have missed those. I have been asking for more than two years for some - any - benfits of leaving and I am still waiting for an answer.
You seem to have the same problem as Jack then QB.

For the two of you to keep on relentlessly saying you've been asking and are still waiting is bizarre.

The answer to your question has been posted repeatedly. Maybe your PC is defective?

Or maybe if you don't agree with an argument or opinion you don't see it?

I don't expect Remainers to agree with Leaver opinions, that is the nature of debate.

Any more than I agree with your views.

But I don't pretend you haven't made your position clear.
You see, this is the only answer that I ever get given and there's nothing wrong with my PC. If you can think of an answer then please tell us. Please. PLease. Just one would be a start.

Which is the first EU-related law that you would like to see repealed and how does it affect you in your daily life?

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Re: Brexit

Post by barney » 13 Feb 2019, 15:53

The first EU law that I would like to see repealed is the is the jurisdiction of the ECJ over our domestic Supreme Court.
It doesn't affect my DAILY life as but it is an infringement on the sovereignty of the United Kingdom.
To be subservient to a foreign court is the slippery slope to oblivion as an independent country.
Could you imagine what the result would have been in 1975, had this been included in the remain lobbying ?
A few like to pretend that it was obvious what the country was voting for back then, but the reality is very different, as history has proved.



From what I am led to believe, the Government is going to transpose all existing EU law into British law and once we have left, we can look at what we want to keep and what we want to ditch.
I'd call that sensible and democratic.

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Re: Brexit

Post by towny44 » 13 Feb 2019, 16:07

Quizzical Bob wrote:
13 Feb 2019, 15:09


You see, this is the only answer that I ever get given and there's nothing wrong with my PC. If you can think of an answer then please tell us. Please. PLease. Just one would be a start.

Which is the first EU-related law that you would like to see repealed and how does it affect you in your daily life?
QB, I don't think I have ever expressed concern about EU related laws, although I do want to be free of any ECJ jurisdiction, and other than stopping our (nett) budget payments there is unlikely to be any current financial benefit,. However I do worry that the increasing emphasis by the EU on supporting the euro and the weaker countries in the eurozone will require even greater resources of labour from what is already a bloated bureaucracy, and whilst we are not in the euro, and should not be required to support the eurozone, it will become ever more difficult to separate these costs from the general running costs.
But the main reasons I want to leave are that I no longer believe that the EU fulfills the needs that drew us in initially, I want to be in a free trade organisation that recognises the needs of the nation states and does not want to be a political super power.
There is, IMO, no need for the European parliament, do away with Euro, because it is economically flawed, and make the members of the commission a rolling group nominated from each states MPs with very limited terms of office, and a watching brief to ensure the bureaucracy does not grow out of hand, and that it runs a balanced budget, and the commission officials should continue to be paid by their country. All of the above should massively reduce the EU bureaucracy and should make it viable for years to come.
Since this is all a pipedream, the only alternative for me was to vote to leave and hopefully agree a sensible trade deal that kept most of what we currently enjoy, but with the prospect of formulating our own trade deals. Not because I felt that we would be financially better off, but hopefully not substantially worse off. Simple as that.
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Re: Brexit

Post by Mervyn and Trish » 13 Feb 2019, 17:08

Quizzical Bob wrote:
13 Feb 2019, 15:09
You see, this is the only answer that I ever get given and there's nothing wrong with my PC.
Well I gave you the benefit of the doubt QBob. If it's not your PC sadly it must be you. I and others have repeatedly given our reasons for wishing to leave, just as you have given yours for wishing to stay. I've seen your posts. I'm at a loss why you haven't seen mine. I'm not repeating them. Just accept we have different views. And in the vote ours prevailed.

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Re: Brexit

Post by Jack Staff » 13 Feb 2019, 19:39

Well that explains a lot. I too have a defective PC.
But as I built it myself I only have myself to blame.
I thought I knew a little bit about computers, but luckily I have been informed recently that I don't.
Testiculi ad Brexitum. Venceremos.

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Re: Brexit

Post by barney » 13 Feb 2019, 20:20

:sarcasm: Touchy!

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